Channel Based Broker

NOTE: This doc assume the shared Knative Eventing components are installed in the knative-eventing namespace. If you installed the shared Knative Eventing components in a different namespace, replace knative-eventing with the name of that namespace.

Knative provides a Broker implementation that uses Channels for event routing. You will need to have a Channel provider installed, for example InMemoryChannel (for development purposes), Kafka, Nats, etc. You can choose from list of available channels

Once you have decided which Channel(s) you want to use and have installed them, you can configure the Broker by controlling which Channel(s) are used. You can choose this as a cluster level default, by namespace or by a specific Broker. These are configured by a config-br-defaults ConfigMap in knative-eventing namespace.

Here’s an example of a configuration that uses Kafka channel for all the Brokers except namespace test-broker-6 which uses InMemoryChannels. First define the ConfigMaps to describe how the Channels of each type are created:

# Define how InMemoryChannels are created
apiVersion: v1
kind: ConfigMap
metadata:
  namespace: knative-eventing
  name: imc-channel
data:
  channelTemplateSpec: |
    apiVersion: messaging.knative.dev/v1alpha1
    kind: InMemoryChannel
# Define how Kafka channels are created. Note we specify
# extra parameters that are particular to Kakfa Channels, namely
# numPartitions as well as replicationFactor.
apiVersion: v1
kind: ConfigMap
metadata:
  name: kafka-channel
  namespace: knative-eventing
data:
  channelTemplateSpec: |
    apiVersion: messaging.knative.dev/v1alpha1
    kind: KafkaChannel
    spec:
      numPartitions: 3
      replicationFactor: 1
kind: ConfigMap
apiVersion: v1
metadata:
  name: config-br-defaults
  namespace: knative-eventing
data:
  default-br-config: |
    clusterDefault:
      apiVersion: v1
      kind: ConfigMap
      name: imc-channel
      namespace: knative-eventing
    namespaceDefaults:
      test-broker-6:
        apiVersion: v1
        kind: ConfigMap
        name: kafka-channel
        namespace: knative-eventing

Installing Broker by Annotation

The easiest way to get Broker installed, is to annotate your namespace (replace default with the desired namespace):

kubectl label namespace default knative-eventing-injection=enabled

This will automatically create a Broker named default in the default namespace. As per above configuration, it would be configured to use Kafka channels.

kubectl -n default get broker default

NOTE Brokers created due to annotation will not be removed if you remove the annotation. For example, if you annotate the namespace, which will then create the Broker as described above. If you now remove the annotation, the Broker will not be removed, you have to manually delete it.

For example, to delete the injected Broker from the foo namespace:

kubectl -n foo delete broker default

Installing Broker by Trigger Annotation

Besides the annotation of the namespace, there is an alternative approach to annotate one of the Triggers, with knative-eventing-injection: enabled:

apiVersion: eventing.knative.dev/v1beta1
kind: Trigger
metadata:
  annotations:
    knative-eventing-injection: enabled
  name: testevents-trigger0
  namespace: default
spec:
  broker: default
  filter:
    attributes:
      type: dev.knative.sources.ping
  subscriber:
    ref:
      apiVersion: serving.knative.dev/v1
      kind: Service
      name: broker-display

However, this approach only works if the Trigger is coupled to the default Broker, and takes only effect when there is no default Broker already present.

Deleting the Trigger does not delete the Broker. With this approach the same rules from the namespace annotation apply here.

Installing Broker Manually

In order to setup a Broker manually, we must first create the required ServiceAccounts and give them the proper RBAC permissions. This setup is required once per namespace. These instructions will use the default namespace, but you can replace it with any namespace you want to install a Broker into.

Create the ServiceAccount objects.

kubectl -n default create serviceaccount eventing-broker-ingress
kubectl -n default create serviceaccount eventing-broker-filter

Then give them the needed RBAC permissions:

kubectl -n default create rolebinding eventing-broker-ingress \
  --clusterrole=eventing-broker-ingress \
  --serviceaccount=default:eventing-broker-ingress
kubectl -n default create rolebinding eventing-broker-filter \
  --clusterrole=eventing-broker-filter \
  --serviceaccount=default:eventing-broker-filter

Note that these commands each use three different objects, all named eventing-broker-ingress or eventing-broker-filter. The ClusterRole is installed with Knative Eventing here. The ServiceAccount was created two commands prior. The RoleBinding is created with this command.

At the time of writing, the broker expects 3 configmaps to run properly: eventing-config-{logging, observability, tracing}. You can manually copy the corresponding configmaps under eventing/config/. An easier way is to create a ConfigMapPropagation object and the configmaps will be automatically propagated. To do so,

cat << EOF | kubectl apply -f -
apiVersion: configs.internal.knative.dev/v1alpha1
kind: ConfigMapPropagation
metadata:
  namespace: default
  name: eventing
spec:
  originalNamespace: knative-eventing
  selector:
    # Only propagate configmaps with a specific label.
    matchLabels:
      knative.dev/config-category: eventing
EOF

Now we can create the Broker. Note that this example uses the name default, but could be replaced by any other valid name. This example uses the defaults for Channel that we configured above in our config-br-defaults ConfigMap, and hence would use Kafka Channels.

cat << EOF | kubectl apply -f -
apiVersion: eventing.knative.dev/v1beta1
kind: Broker
metadata:
  namespace: default
  name: default
EOF

If you wanted to explicitly specify the Configuration of the Broker, you could do so by using spec.config, like so (manually overriding it to use InMemoryChannels).

cat << EOF | kubectl apply -f -
apiVersion: eventing.knative.dev/v1beta1
kind: Broker
metadata:
  namespace: default
  name: broker-2
spec:
  config:
    apiVersion: v1
    kind: ConfigMap
    name: imc-channel
    namespace: knative-eventing
EOF

Handling failed event delivery

Broker allows you to specify what to do in the case if failed event delivery, say you have a consumer (function for example) that’s failing to process the event. You can use delivery for it:

apiVersion: eventing.knative.dev/v1beta1
kind: Broker
metadata:
  name: default
spec:
  config:
    apiVersion: v1
    kind: ConfigMap
    namespace: knative-eventing
    name: imc-channel
  # Deliver failed events here
  delivery:
    deadLetterSink:
      ref:
        apiVersion: serving.knative.dev/v1
        kind: Service
        name: error-handler

You can find out more about delivery spec details here.